API senior fellow J. Pepper Bryars joined Pete Riehm’s Common Sense Radio show on Mobile’s 106.5 FM Thursday to discuss why the state legislature should cut taxes elsewhere, possibly on groceries, while raising the gas tax for roads, bridges, and port improvements.

“If they’re going to ask us to pay $300 more a year at the gas station, then they ought to save us $300 a year at the grocery store,” Bryars explained.

Read more about API’s revenue-neutral proposal here, and listen to the radio interview below:

 

 


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